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Frequently asked questions about dental implants

Frequently asked questions about dental implants

Table of contents

  1. What are dental implants?
  2. How long do implants last?
  3. How much do implants cost?
  4. Do health insurance companies cover a part of the implant costs?
  5. Are dental implants also rejected by the body?
  6. Must every lost tooth be replaced by a dental implant?
  7. How many implants do I need for a denture, with total tooth loss?
  8. Do I need a general anaesthetic for implants?
  9. How long can I not work after an implant setting?
  10. What complaints can I expect?
  11. Can you place an implant immediately after removing a tooth?
  12. How long to wait after implantation before the denture or crown can be put on?
  13. Can implants be put on in children and adolescents?
  14. Must I be quite healthy for implants?
  15. Must I have multiple surgeries?
  16. Is there a high age for implant patients?
  17. What material are dental implants made of?
  18. Is there the best implant system?
  19. I have osteoporosis, can you still put implants?
  20. My jaw is already strongly shrunk. Will implants still go then?
  21. How often do I have to go for a check-up after an implantation?
  22. When is a pre-implant surgery necessary?
  23. Helps own blood accelerate wound healing?

1. What are dental implants?

A dental implant is in fact an artificial tooth root, usually made of titanium. They come in cylindrical or screw-like form. After preparation of the jawbone, the implantation is carried out with special instruments or drills by a surgeon. After the jawbone has been prepared, the implant is placed with special instruments or drills by an oral surgeon or a dentist who has trained as an implantologist. A dental implant usually consists of three parts.

  - Superstructure: prosthetic structure (crown, bridge, telescope)
  - Implant post: connects implant body and superstructure
  - Implant body: is screwed or hammered into the jawbone


2. How long do implants last?

The success rates of implantology over longer periods of time are over 90 percent, which means that in most cases dental implants not only heal without problems in the jawbone, but after ten years more than 90 percent of dental implants are still completely in tact.

Implants protrude through the mucous membrane into the oral cavity like natural teeth. Therefore, like teeth, they are exposed to unfavourable factors of the oral cavity. These are: Food residues, plaque and the associated pathogens. pathogens. Inadequate care can lead to processes similar to those in natural teeth. natural tooth can occur. These processes can lead to bone loss via gingival pockets. lead to bone loss via gingival pockets and thus endanger the dental implant. Absolute prerequisite for long-term success is therefore good oral hygiene, which must be and continuous care by the dentist even after the work has been completed. by the dentist even after completion of the work.

Other risk factors for long-term success are heavy smoking and certain general diseases such as certain general diseases such as diabetes type I (insulin injections), longer cortisone treatment, e.g. for certain rheumatic diseases - but also a bad bone bed. This risk should be assessed as precisely as possible in each individual case. as possible in each individual case.


3. How much do implants cost?

For professional reasons, German doctors are not allowed to quote prices on the internet. In addition, the prices are often very different. For a single tooth implant, for example, the price difference can be well over 1000 euros. Euro difference in price. Therefore you will find here under: Find good dentists a comprehensive guide including addresses of inexpensive and certified dentists, so that you can also get cheap to get inexpensive implants in Germany. Even if you first have to have bone augmentation or a sinus lift, or if you have other difficulties, there are favourable possibilities. In order to clarify this, a personal consultation incl. examination at one of our consultation including an examination with one of our partner dentists is essential.

4. Do the health insurance companies cover part of the implant costs?

The private health insurances usually pay a large part of the costs of dental implants. dental implants. To estimate the reimbursement, it is helpful to submit a cost estimate. It is helpful to submit a cost estimate.

As a member of the statutory health insurance funds, you will also receive the normal fixed allowance for implant solutions within the framework of the findings-oriented fixed allowance. From January 2005, it is irrelevant whether a missing tooth is replaced by an implant or a bridge. replaced by an implant or a bridge. In any case, a treatment and cost plan must be submitted to your health insurance fund for approval before treatment begins. Only then will you also receive the allowance for implant-supported teeth. In other words, only for the dentures on the implants. Your dental implants themselves are purely a private benefit.


5. Are dental implants also rejected by the body?

Rejection reactions - as they are known in allergies - occur in the case of dental implants, especially those made of pure titanium, are extremely rare. Frequently inflammations, which we know from natural teeth and which can naturally also occur in dental implants. natural occurrence with dental implants, were mistakenly thought to be rejection reactions. reactions. In contrast to earlier opinions, according to which the titanium surface surface is said to form a chemical bond with the bone cells, more recent studies show that recent studies show that titanium also leads to a non-specific foreign body reaction. leads to a non-specific foreign body reaction. However, this does not lead to rejection in most cases. Compare Titanium intolerance

Although titanium has fulfilled the long-awaited wishes of dental surgeons for a suitable a suitable material for dental prostheses in many respects, titanium has has fulfilled many of the wishes of dental surgeons for a suitable material for dental prostheses, further improvements are constantly being researched. The main focus of research is on optimising the surface of titanium, but also on titanium, but also completely different materials, such as ceramic implants.


6. Does every lost tooth have to be replaced by a dental implant?

No: A stable implant can also support more teeth. The The load-bearing capacity depends on the bone situation and its thickness, height and strength, but also the position of the implant in the dental arch. Furthermore, it is whether the implant is a fixed or a removable - also supported on the mucosa - prosthesis. or a removable prosthesis, which is also worn on the mucosa.


7. How many implants do I need for a prosthesis, in case of total tooth loss?

In the case of an edentulous jaw, 4 implants are usually aimed for. (All on 4). A solution of 2 mini implants improves the hold of the prosthesis. the retention of the prosthesis, but offers less stability than 4 implants. If the solution is to be (i.e. it can only be removed for cleaning by loosening the latches or screws), then screws for cleaning), 6 implants in the lower jaw and 8 implants in the upper jaw are and 8 in the upper jaw are recommended. Of course, the number has to be determined individually. determine the number individually. A long implant can be loaded with a higher chewing pressure than a short one. short one.


8. Does one need a general anaesthetic for implants?

No, implants are usually placed under local anaesthesia, i.e. after an injection. injection. In any case, however, the patient should be driven home, as the home, as the stress is greater than with a normal dental treatment. usual dental treatment. A general anaesthetic is only advisable if the procedure involves is not possible with a local anaesthetic. Furthermore, there is the option of injection, which puts the patient into a sleep-like state. state of sleep.

Finally, in patients with significant cardiovascular problems, an anaesthesiologist should anaesthetist should monitor the patient's condition with special equipment during the procedure. during the procedure.

9. How long can I not work after an implant setting?

In most cases, you will not be able to work properly on the next and the next day. day is not yet given. More precise information can only be provided after an examination and assessment. and an assessment of the operational expenditure.


10. What complaints should one expect?

More precise information can only be given after an examination and assessment of the surgical effort. of the operational expenditure. Complaints often occurred for a few days. days, but these can be easily suppressed with painkillers.

Swelling continues to develop. The swelling increases during the first two days after the The swelling increases in the first two days after the operation and then subsides. The extent of the swelling The extent of the swelling depends on the size of the operation as well as on the cooling by the patient. the patient. Furthermore, a visible bruise may occur.
Modern minimally invasive implantology is the gold standard today. This means that the exact implantation by means of a drilling template. The mucous membrane of the gums no longer has to be opened. be opened. The exact position calculation by means of DVT (digital volume tomography) enables a "direct drilling". The operating time can be reduced by half and the discomfort after the intervention are also significantly less.


11. Can an implant be placed immediately after the removal of a tooth?

Yes, but..... immediate implantation has the advantage of a shorter waiting time and, above all waiting time and, above all, faster use of the bone that is still present. Otherwise, the thin bone of the tooth socket can often deteriorate rapidly after the tooth has been removed. after the tooth has been removed. In any case, however, there must be the condition that the jaw bone is stable after the removal of the tooth and does not show any inflammation. inflammation. A surgical microscope or magnifying glasses are very useful in assessing this situation. magnifying glasses are very useful. Unfortunately, the above-mentioned conditions are not fulfilled in the are not given in the majority of cases.

For safety reasons, the patient usually waits 8 weeks to 6 months after the tooth removal. often 4 months after the tooth has been removed. During this period, the bone has During this time, new functional bone has formed from the bone cavity of the removed tooth. A good way to help patients immediately after tooth loss is to use transitional implants. These are thin implants (same material as the final implants, only different shape and size). implants, only different shape and size), which can be loaded immediately in order to give the patient the patient an improved hold of the denture and can be removed again as soon as the removed as soon as the thick implants are firmly healed. have healed.


12. How long do you have to wait after implantation until the prosthesis or crown can be fitted?

There are clear differences depending on the position and load of the implant. and load of the implant. Usually 3 months are waited in the lower jaw and 4-5 months in the upper jaw. 4-5 months in the upper jaw before inserting dentures. In the anterior region of the lower jaw, with stable the waiting time can be reduced even further. In the rear area of the In the posterior region of the upper jaw, it is better to wait more than 6 months. However, the waiting time depends not only on the position of the but also on the overall condition of the patient. For example bone healing is faster in a young patient than in an older diabetic. Recent research has shown that with the help of structured implant surfaces, the healing time is further reduced. This is a development for many patients. For hygienic reasons, some doctors are not in favour of the are critical of the tendency to enlarge the surface of the implants with the help of critical of the tendency to enlarge the surface of the implants with the help of roughening. Even if the healing time can be shortened by this the risk of bacterial colonisation exists if oral hygiene is not optimal. the risk of bacterial colonisation if oral hygiene is not optimal on an implant surface that has been artificially severely fissured.
Thanks to the new minimally invasive implantology, the gums are injured much less during implantation. Bridges, dentures and other dental prostheses can be inserted after a shorter healing period.


13. Can implants also be placed in children and adolescents?

The placement of implants in adolescents is carried out to support dental to support the adjustment of the teeth. The implants in the palate or behind the The implants in the palate or behind the teeth can replace a more complex appliance.

However, the replacement of lost teeth in adolescents with implants is not yet However, replacing lost teeth in adolescents with implants is problematic because the jaw has not yet finished growing. The jaw area around an implant does not grow normally. Therefore implants should should not be placed before the major growth spurt. This means for girls up to the age of 14 years and for boys until 16 years. I like to wait even longer (18 [girls] or 20 [boys] years), because even after the big growth spurt, the jaws are 1 to 2 mm in height after the major growth spurt. (for men even up to 25 years!)

If other options than implantation are not an option, there is the possibility of implantation are out of the question, there is the possibility of using screw-off crowns to of the jaw bone by changing the visible crown of the tooth. cosmetically.


14. Do I have to be completely healthy for implants?

No, but there are diseases that pose a higher risk. These include diabetes for which tablets are not sufficient, blood cancer, condition after jaw irradiation and severe cardiovascular disease. In In individual cases, an exact assessment of the risk is made after consultation with the the family doctor. A risk-benefit assessment must be carried out each time. So a patient who has received chemotherapy for a gastrointestinal cancer will still not be excluded from implantation, because the gastrointestinal tract tract requires a high-fibre diet. In such cases, the deviation between the advantages and advantages-disadvantages will always take place in the triangle patient-practitioner-implantologist.


15. Must I be operated on more than once?

In most cases, one operation is enough to place the implants. For implants that are implants placed under the mucous membrane, they must be removed from their covering before they are loaded  from their covering mucosa. This is done in örtliche and is a very small procedure compared to the placement of the implants. procedure.

But it may also be necessary to have a bone augmentation to stabilise the jaw before the implant is placed. bone augmentation to stabilise the jaw. see below


16. Is there a maximum age for implant patients?

No: The decisive factor is not the nominal age, but the biological age. Implantation in a 50-year-old patient after organ transplantation is usually a high age. usually represents a higher risk than the nominal age of 80 years for a years in a healthy patient with good bone structure.

17. What material are dental implants made of?

The most commonly used systems are made of pure titanium. Titanium bonds well with the bone tissue. There are virtually no allergic reactions here. and titanium shows good stability. Ceramic implants also show very good healing and are cosmetically hard to beat. But they are even more expensive.


18. Is there the best implant system?

This question cannot be answered in general. The major implant implant systems have all reached a high level. Each system has advantages in certain cases and disadvantages in other cases compared to similar brands. comparative brands. Implant systems can be compared to car brands. The The big brands all make good cars. But there is no car that is equal in all superior to all the others in all aspects.

The decisive factor is not the implant manufacturer, but that the connection between the implant and the abutment is a cone connection.


19. I have osteoporosis, can one still put implants then?

Osteoporosis is not seen as an exclusion criterion against implants. The final decision can only be made after a thorough examination in each individual case.


20. My jaw has already shrunk considerably. Will implants still go then?

For a reliable long-term success, the jaw should generally have a width of at least of at least 5 mm and a height of 10 mm. The height and width of the jaw can be adjusted by can be determined by a panoramic x-ray, examination and, if necessary, a computer tomography. computer tomography. If there is not enough bone substance, bone augmentation is necessary. bone augmentation is possible. Depending on the amount of bone required, the following are used for bone augmentation the bone chips from the drill hole of the implant, bone material from other regions of the regions of the jaw, e.g. the wisdom tooth region or, if there is a greater need, also from the also from the hip bone. The hip bone is particularly used for used to build up the side area of the upper jaw. In the case of toothlessness, bone is lost there in favour of the jaw cavity. With a with a so-called maxillary sinus floor elevation, often called a sinus lift, this space is space is filled again. 5 months later, dental implants can be placed.

21. How often do I have to go to a check-up after an implantation?

Regular examinations of the implants are urgently required, since early stages of possible inflammations are much easier to treat. In addition, severe inflammations can also inflammation can also lead to bone resorption and thus to the loss of the implant.

After placing the implant: After 2 days, after 7 days, then after 3 weeks. and then monthly.

After completion of all work: The first time after 6 weeks, then twice in then twice every three months, then twice every six months and then every year.


22. When is a pre-operation necessary before implant placement?

The basic principle of implant placement is that the implant has to be firmly in the upper or lower jaw. If this is not guaranteed, the bone must be built up beforehand. must be built up beforehand. This is done a few months beforehand.

If the implant is fixed after insertion, but a part of the implant body is not yet covered by bone tissue, then the bone must be built up. of the implant body is not yet covered with bone tissue, then this part can be with a filler during the same operation.

The optimal way to consolidate and cover the implant is to use your own bone material, as it does not lead to a defence reaction and supports the formation of new bone more. more than artificial materials. The bone parts that are still alive after are germ cells for new bone of their own. The bone part for transplantation is bone for transplantation is preferably obtained from suitable parts of the jaw. of the jaw. The disadvantage of this method is the more extensive procedure. In the case of large bone bone loss, parts of the pelvic bone are also used. However, this must under general anaesthesia. There is also the possibility of filling smaller defects with special with special membranes and bone substitutes. To avoid the bone grafting procedure, new bone substitutes are constantly being developed (Müs). new bone substitutes are being developed (München Symposium 1999). So far, however in independent long-term studies, none has been able to replace the patient's own bone as an replace the patient's own bone as an optimum.

New research findings, however, give cause for hope. For example, studies on the so-called on distraction osteogenesis, for example, suggest promising results. are expected. This refers to a procedure in which an arch of bone that is too small is is continuously stretched and thus enlarged.

Please consult your dentist or oral surgeon in each individual case. inform you.


23. Does own blood help to speed up wound healing?

The blood contains different parts. In the plasma outside the (oxygen-carrying) (oxygen-carrying) red blood cells, there are many proteins that promote the formation of new bone. bone formation. For this purpose, blood is taken from the arm before the procedure. the individual components are separated in a centrifuge and the desired plasma is finally the desired plasma with an increased concentration of these useful proteins. back into the wounds. According to previous experience, the patients experience, patients have wounds that heal quickly and without problems. However further studies are needed before we can assume that implants with their that implants with autologous plasma can be loaded immediately.

 

Dental implants was updated at 19.10.2021 14:18.